Put a Cork In It – A Lesson on Corks from Traditional Wooden Wine Cork to Wine Bottle Caps

put a cork in it

The tradition of the wine cork is almost as old as wine itself. For thousands of years, the preservation of wine has always been done with a piece of bark from a tree that solely grows in Portugal. That’s right, that cork you pop every time you open a bottle of wine is literally tree bark. The look is classic, the feel is empowering, and it requires a little care and skill to open up that time capsule of juice. However, as wine production increases every year the cork tree population is decreasing just as fast.

The tree itself cannot be harvested for the first 25 years and after that, one must wait 9-12 years to harvest the bark again. With thousands of wineries popping up yearly, the demand is getting higher which increases the price. Now winemakers are seeking new cheaper alternatives that are proving to be just as good, if not better at sealing that precious liquid. Here’s just a few…

Put a Cork In It - A Lesson on Wine Corks from Traditional Wood Corks to Bottlecaps

Screw Cap:

Invented by the French, Yes it’s true. The screw cap is dominating the wine industry with its aging ability and price effectiveness. The main reason that bottle is so cheap is not because the wine is garbage but because that screw cap cost nearly nothing to the price of a traditional wine cork. The discount gets passed on to the consumer. Talk about a twist!

Put a Cork In It - A Lesson on Wine Corks from Traditional Wood Corks to Bottlecaps

Synthetic Cork:

We’ve all seen it… you rip off that fancy foil at the top of the bottle only to find a plastic imposter inside. A synthetic cork usually means the wine is meant to drink young. As long as that bottle is less than 5 years old, you’re good to go.

Put a Cork In It - A Lesson on Wine Corks from Traditional Wood Corks to Bottlecaps

Crown Caps:

It’s not beer I promise! This is a new but it’s headed down the path of becoming a ‘trend’. Crown caps also known as a beer cap is actually a major part of sparkling wine production. However, these caps are by far the cheapest way to secure the wines and just look cool AF.

Put a Cork In It - A Lesson on Wine Corks from Traditional Wood Corks to Bottlecaps

Glass Stoppers:

Big in Austria not so popular anywhere else, the glass stopper is making its rounds. Currently only those crazy Austrians are using this method but it works well and you can even reuse the glass stopper in other wine bottles! Buy a bottle of Austrian wine! It’s the wine equivalent of a cracker jack! Delicious and you wine a prize…

Put a Cork In It - A Lesson on Wine Corks from Traditional Wood Corks to Bottlecaps

Growlers:

Lose the bottle homie! Growlers are moving from breweries to wineries, and for good reason. Wines on tap are cool now and a refillable growler is much cheaper than buying bottles every week. As long as your drinking that growler within a week, that wine is still mighty tasty. A growler cost around $10 and refills are around the same price. Let your inner hipster out and buy a growler.

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VOICE OF MODERN WINE CULTURE